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Scottish Greens propose new deal for onshore wind power in Scotland


By Jonathan Clark

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THE Scottish Greens’ lead candidate for the Highland and Islands region has called for a new deal for Scotland’s wind energy supply to meet future demand for electricity as fossil fuels are phased out.

Ariane Burgess believes that a new deal could create hundreds of supply chain jobs across the country, including in Moray.

Ariane Burgess, Scottish Greens' Highlands and Islands candidate.
Ariane Burgess, Scottish Greens' Highlands and Islands candidate.

The Scottish Greens' manifesto pledges to replace existing turbines with newer, more powerful models – doubling the size of the industry.

The aim is to make it easier to invest in onshore wind, with the condition of keeping at least 70 per cent of the supply chain in Scotland.

Ariane Burgess said: “Renewable energy is absolutely critical to meeting climate targets and ensuring our survival.

"Onshore wind already contributes a large amount to Scotland’s energy mix, but it has stagnated under the UK and Scottish governments.

“As we shift to electric transport and heating solutions, the demand will grow and so must the onshore wind sector.

"That’s why the Scottish Greens are proposing a new deal for wind energy to encourage the sector to upgrade existing turbines and expand.

"We would ensure that the Scottish supply chain is protected, which could create jobs for Moray in the process.

“This would be good for the planet, but also for our communities. Scotland can be a leader in renewable energy and Moray could be at the forefront of that, but only if we invest in it. Our future depends on it.”

The Scottish Greens are pledging to upgrade existing wind farms and ensure the delivery of an additional 8GW of onshore wind by 2030, creating 3200 jobs plus another 3000 in the supply chain.

The party also wants at least 20 per cent of new windfarms to be owned by the community and will require all new onshore wind farms to have a net positive impact on nature, for example through peatland and habitat restoration.


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