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Toxic algae NOT in Elgin pond


By Alistair Whitfield


Three dogs died on Monday after swimming in an affected pond.
Three dogs died on Monday after swimming in an affected pond.

Contrary to an official warning a toxic algae that can kill pets has not been found in Elgin's Cooper Park pond.

The British Veterinary Association (BVA) issued a public warning yesterday stating that blue/green algae had been discovered in Elgin as well as Edinburgh.

The algae's blooms can be harmful even in swallowed in small quantities.

Water samples were taken from the pond in Cooper Park last week after Moray Council was alerted to its possible presence by SEPA, the Scottish Environment Protection Agency.

However the tests in Elgin have now been confirmed as negative.

Responding to the statement by the BVA, a Moray Council spokesperson said: "SEPA officers conducted water sampling in Cooper Park and confirmed a negative result on the August 7.

"We understand the concern about the blue tinge to the water may have been as a result of the agents we put into the water to prevent blue green algae forming."

The BVA decided to issue a warning after three dogs in the USA died on Monday just hours after swimming together in an affected pond in North Carolina.

Symptoms can appear within a few minutes or hours, depending on the type of toxin ingested, and commonly include vomiting, diarrhoea, drooling, disorientation, breathing troubles and seizures.

If left untreated, the toxin can cause liver damage and ultimately be rapidly fatal.

The BVA has advised dog owners to keep their pets on a lead around water bodies known or suspected to have blue-green algae bloom.

It also suggests washing them in clean water on their return home if they have been swimming.



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