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Kinloss engineers part of UN mission


By Alistair Whitfield


The Royal Engineers in South Sudan
The Royal Engineers in South Sudan

ONE of the poorest and most fragile countries on earth is receiving help from the Royal Engineers in Kinloss.

About 300 personnel are providing engineering infrastructure in South Sudan, which is currently gripped by civil war.

Their tasks include erecting solar lights, building observation posts to improve the security at civilian camps and laying water supply pipes.

They are also building a hospital for the United Nations and constructing helicopter landing sites.

In addition, the role includes providing training for South Sudanese civilians, such as in bricklaying, concreting and carpentry to help them develop their own, sustainable future.

A military spokeswoman in Moray said: "As one of the largest regiments in the British Army this is a busy year for the Royal Engineers in Kinloss with troops deployed across the globe."

Another 150 engineers are presently returning from a large-scale construction project in the Falkland Islands, where they have been building accommodation.

For many, this has meant deployments of 18 months.

Kinloss also has troops in Kenya, Estonia, Cyprus and the Middle East.

The spokesman added: "All these tasks are supported by designers, draughtsmen, technicians and a host of logistic specialists.

"This ensures that when a Royal Engineer commits to a task, no matter where in the world, the necessary tools, equipment and supplies arrive to ensure it can be completed on time.

"Every Royal Engineer learns a trade as well as combat engineering skills.

"Recruits can choose from 12 apprenticeships, which will stand them in good stead when our troops finally leave the Army."



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